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RELEASE DATE

13th Sept 2019

Brant re-mixed his classic album with original engineer Tony Mason using the original tapes at Tony's studio in the desert and the results are incredible. Jalamanta is fully realized (with new art too!) and very much worth the re-buy. Get one now, link below!

"Jalamanta was a life changing record for me. Its the record that launched my journey as Brant Bjork. Listening to the tapes 20 years later was amazing. Tony Mason and myself were transported back to that moment in time.
Jalamanta was a first for both Tony and myself. My first record as a solo artist and his first record as an engineer. We didn't think twice about re-mixing it. With our combined experience over the years, we knew we could take Jalamanta to the place we always wanted it to go..and we did. Dig it."

- Brant Bjork"

 
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jacoozzi review

 

Roll tape. Jam. Repeat. It’s not a new methodology by any means, but it still works, and one imagines the process becomes more complicated when there’s only one person involved. Fortunately for anyone who might find themselves immersed in the Heavy Psych Sounds-issued Jacoozzi, that one person is Brant Bjork, who plays all instruments throughout the release recorded in 2010. It was a productive era for Bjork in the studio and on the road, as the years immediately preceding had seen him touring with his then-band, Brant Bjork and the Bros., as well as putting out LPs at a steady clip like 2006’s serene, acoustic Tres Dias (reissue review here), 2007’s Somera Sól (discussed here) and 2008’s Punk Rock Guilt (though that was recorded in 2005) through his Low Desert Punk Records imprint, and the former Kyuss drummer was still a couple years off from putting his solo career aside to participate in the semi-reunion Kyuss Lives!/Vista Chino circa 2011-2013. It would seem to have been during the making of what became 2010’s Gods and Goddesses (review here) that Bjork, apparently frustrated with how the material was coming together, scrapped everything and instead jammed out Jacoozzi with Tony Mason engineering for what has ended up as 10 tracks and 46 minutes of mostly-instrumentalist heavy chill mastery.

 

And like its cover art with an image of Bjork — ex-Kyuss as noted, also formerly of Fu Manchu and by 2010 already with no fewer than eight solo/bandleader full-lengths under his belt — staring directly at the camera, surrounded by an aura of muted shades like a ’70s wall hanging, Jacoozzi is about as dead-ahead and stripped-down as he’s ever gotten. As an entire work, it oozes vibe, and even the 44-second drum bed “Five Hundred Thousand Dollars” has a sleek groove, but it is definitely a collection of individual movements rather than something written as a single entity. It’s a different process of capturing the moment, then, not about bringing in a collection of pre-written songs and putting them down to establish an overarching feel, but getting there from another direction, piecing together jams one component at a time until finally a song like the mellow highlight “Black and White Wonderland” is built to where it needs to be.

 

That there are no vocals on the bulk of the material feels on one level like a missed opportunity at times — one imagines an improv rant over the tense wah guitar of “Oui” or a couple verses added to “Lost in Race” would’ve added to the effect rather than detracted from it — but it speaks to the circumstance in which the record was made and the fact that it likely wasn’t intended to be a record at all. It was Bjork expunging ideas in the studio, and getting stuff out of his head either as some kind of catharsis or to save and make into songs later before returning to work on Gods and Goddesses. Thus it is the nature of even the jazzy electric piano in “Mixed Nuts” or the cool-toned mood-setting in opener and longest track (immediate points) “Can’t Out Run the Sun” to be what they are and to feel like ideas waiting to be fleshed out. Jacoozzi isn’t a traditional Brant Bjork record, as much as that exists. At its core, it’s very much a drum album. The first element that enters on “Can’t Out Run the Sun” is a quiet tom progression, and “Mexico City Blues,” “Five Hundred Thousand Dollars” (which is only drums), “Oui,” and vocalized closer “Do You Love Your World?” all lead with drums one way or the other.

 

The only song that starts with guitar is the penultimate “Polarized,” which swells in with Hendrixian fuzz feedback before its slow ride cymbal backbeat takes hold and continues to wind its way forward in that fashion for all of its four minutes, with keys and bass and drums behind it. Other cuts like righteously on-the-beat “Guerrilla Funk” (premiered here) and the sleek “Mixed Nuts” and “Lost in Race” bring the drums and guitar, etc., in at the same time, but either way, it’s still drums at the foundation of the material, and that’s somewhat inevitable given how it was recorded, essentially constructed on top of improvised drum parts. Given an infinity of time, money and interest, might Bjork have turned all of these jams into full-fledged verse/chorus songs? I don’t know. Does it matter? Jacoozzi works as well as it does precisely because it’s not that, and it gives a different and heretofore largely unseen look at the process by which Bjork creates. It’s a single creative burst from nine years ago. One should not go into it expecting the same kind of fleshed-out songcraft as Bjork featured on last year’s Mankind Woman (review here), but if that bit of necessary context makes Jacoozzi a fan-piece, then the album is only an argument in favor of fandom.

 

Brant Bjork is no stranger to carrying a record on his own. The majority of his landmark 1999 solo debut Jalamanta (discussed here) was him alone, and certainly other outings along the way have been as well. Of those, it seems to make the most sense to liken Jacoozzi to Tres Dias. Not necessarily in terms of sound, but idea. Tres Dias was a mostly-unplugged collection of songs, some of which were older, some were newer, but all were given a new interpretation in a setting that was as intimate as possible. It was a rawer glimpse of Bjork‘s songwriting process than he’d given before. Jacoozzi functions to do much the same thing, but with a different target. “Do You Love Your World?” might be considered “finished,” but if Tres Dias was showcasing the songs, Jacoozzi is showcasing the jams that birthed them. And while Bjork has done plenty of jamming on recent albums, there’s never been a work so purely based around the idea, and that makes Jacoozzi all the more special of a moment to have been caught on tape, and after being shelved for nine years, its arrival is as welcome as it was awaited. It may be an aside, or a kind of footnote in Bjork‘s ongoing creative progression, but damn is it listenable. - The Obelisk

 

 

Brant Bjork Partial Discography:

With Kyuss as drummer, songwriter:

1990 Sons of Kyuss

1991 Wretch

1992 Blues for the Red Sun

1994 Kyuss, aka Welcome to Sky Valley

2000 Muchas Gracias: The Best of Kyuss

 

With De-Con as drummer:

1995 Balls for Days

 

With Fu Manchu as drummer:

1994 No One Rides for Free (Producer only)

1997 The Action is Go

1999 Eatin' Dust

1999 King of the Road

2001 California Crossing

 

With Ché as guitarist/vocalist/composer:

2000 Sounds of Liberation

 

With Mondo Generator as drummer:

2000 Cocaine Rodeo

2003 A Drug Problem That Never Existed

 

With Vista Chino as drummer/composer:

2013 Peace

 

Solo and solo bands:

1999 Jalamanta

2002 Brant Bjork and the Operators

2003 Keep Your Cool

2004 Local Angel

2005 Saved by Magic (Brant Bjork & the Bros.)

2007 Tres Dias

2007 Somera Sól (Brant Bjork & the Bros.)

2008 Punk Rock Guilt

2010 Gods and Goddesses

2014 Black Power Flower (Brant Bjork & the Low Desert Punk Band)

2016 Tao of the Devil

2017 Europe '16

2018 Mankind Woman

2019 Jacoozzi

 

Others:

1995 Solarfeast, Gossamer (Producer)

1998 Desert Sessions Vol. 1 & 2 (Drums, Bass)

1999 Desert Sessions Vol. 5 & 6 (Drums, Guitar)

2004 Auf Der Maur, Auf Der Maur (Drums)

2005 Yellow #5, Demon Crossing (Drums)